|Table of Contents|

[1] Zhang Ning, Shi Zhuangbin, Zhang Yunlong, Zhang Xiaojun, et al. Estimating walking access area for rail transit stationbased on discrete choice model [J]. Journal of Southeast University (English Edition), 2018, (3): 377-385. [doi:10.3969/j.issn.1003-7985.2018.03.014]
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Estimating walking access area for rail transit stationbased on discrete choice model()
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Journal of Southeast University (English Edition)[ISSN:1003-7985/CN:32-1325/N]

Volumn:
Issue:
2018 3
Page:
377-385
Research Field:
Traffic and Transportation Engineering
Publishing date:
2018-09-20

Info

Title:
Estimating walking access area for rail transit stationbased on discrete choice model
Author(s):
Zhang Ning1 Shi Zhuangbin1 Zhang Yunlong2 Zhang Xiaojun1
1Intelligent Transportation System Research Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China
2Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA
Keywords:
walking access area urban rail transit discrete choice model walking environment competing traffic modes passenger transportation demand
PACS:
U239.5
DOI:
10.3969/j.issn.1003-7985.2018.03.014
Abstract:
The discrete choice model is used to estimate the walking access area of rail transit stations while considering the influence of existing competition from other traffic modes. The acceptable walking access area is determined according to the willingness of passengers to walk who prefer rail transit compared with bus and automobile. Empirical studies were conducted using the survey data of six stations from the rail transit in Nanjing, China. The results indicate that the rail transit is more preferable compared with bus and private automobile in this case when excluding the influence of individual and environmental factors. It is found that passengers tend to underestimate their willingness to walk. The acceptable walking access area of every rail transit station is different from each other. Suburban stations generally have a larger walking access area than downtown stations. In addition, a better walking environment and a scarcer surrounding traffic environment can also lead to a larger walking area. The model was confirmed to be effective and reasonable according to the model validation. This study can be of benefit to the passenger transportation demand estimation in the location planning and evaluation of rail transit stations.

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Memo

Memo:
Biography: Zhang Ning(1972—), male, doctor, associate professor, ningzhang1972@gmail.com.
Foundation items: The Scientific Research Foundation of Graduate School of Southeast University(No.YBJJ1838), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities(No.KYLX16_0270), the Foundation of China Scholarship Council(No.201606090240).
Citation: Zhang Ning, Shi Zhuangbin, Zhang Yunlong, et al. Estimating walking access area for rail transit station based on discrete choice model[J].Journal of Southeast University(English Edition), 2018, 34(3):377-385.DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1003-7985.2018.03.014.
Last Update: 2018-09-20